Intolerable Acts as a Cause of Revolution

 
Intolerable Acts as a Cause of Revolution

Introduction

The American Revolutionary War refers to the military conflicts and clashes between the States of America and Great Britain which took place in 1775-1783. The revolutionary war has become a turning point in the history of America since it has led to many qualitative changes on the political, economic and social levels. When speaking about the reasons and causes of the revolution, it is essential to mention the tension between the American states and British government. Numerous economic, social and political limitations and restrictions caused the wave of protests and led to the war. Among the main causes of revolution, the adoption of Intolerable Acts of 1774 should be considered. In fact, the introduction of the Intolerable Acts, which directly violated the economic freedom and rights of Americans and benefited the British royalty, demonstrated the uselessness of cooperation between two nations and inspired thousands of Americans to defend their independence and sovereignty.

Causes of the American Revolutionary War

In fact, the primary reason for the revolutionary war is American dissatisfaction with the British control and desire to become economically and politically independent of the British Crown. In fact, many factors contributed to the conflict between the American states and Great Britain. The most notable ones were connected with the economic aspect of both states. The reason is that Great Britain regarded America as the market for selling and distributing its products and items. Correspondingly, British regulations were aimed at benefiting the island instead of American states. Great Britain established numerous trading contacts with other countries and continents and used American ports for its purposes. Obviously, such strategy caused great dissatisfaction among Americans and triggered first waves of protests and armed clashes.

Moreover, the relations between America and Great Britain deteriorated after the Seven Year’s War, which had ended with the triumph of the latter. After the war, Great Britain imposed sigificant taxes on the colonies. Many American leaders regarded this act as the direct intervention in the national politics of States and discrimination of economic and social freedom of American citizens. The introduction of taxes on imported goods and trading met the same reaction from the American community. As a result, American leaders demanded liberation from the British influence and protection of state economy from the external impacts.

Largely, the political situation and relationship between America and Great Britain amplified the tension between two nations. At the end of 18th century, America had no representatives in the British government. In other words, British governors and political leaders did not pay much attention to the interests of the American nation and acceptance of favorable laws and regulations. Therefore, this fact explains the introduction of the unfair taxation and economic dependence of the American states. Analogically, it was one of the driving forces behind the revolution and demands for separation from British royalty.

Finally, some military clashes and conflicts between America and British army preceded the American Revolutionary War. In fact, the armed clash in the towns of Lexington and Concord provoked the mass dissatisfaction with the British control and decision to claim American identity and independence. In 1775, as a result of the armed conflict between America and Britain, eight people died and ten were wounded. Consequently, this incident raised the wave of protests and caused the direct fight against the British Crown.

To summarize, the cause of the revolutionary war was the restriction of American freedom under the destructive influence of the British monarchy. A special role in the raise of military conflict belonged to the adoption of the Intolerable Acts in 1774. Apparently, this event demonstrated the direct impact of the British royalty on the economic state of the American states and reflected complete control over the colonies’ economy. As a result, Intolerable Acts inaugurated the fiight for independence and possibility to lead independent internal politics.

Intolerable Acts of 1774

In 1774, Great Britain passed a series of laws and regulations, which strongly limited the American economic freedom and rights. The introduction of those measures related to the Boston Tea Party, which was a well-known protest of the American political leaders against British influence on the trading and economic relations of American colonies. The protest strongly harmed the economic stability of the British monarchy as well as showed the reduction of its popularity and influence on the colonies. As a result, the British government accepted the decision to punish American patriots and introduce new laws and orders aimed at reducing its economic power and incomes.

The first act known as Boston Port Act demanded the closure of the port until the reimbursement of the losses connected with the protest. It is important to mention that Boston was one of the biggest ports of America and provided the country with great incomes and profits.[1] Therefore, closure of the port presupposed significant economic and financial losses for the entire city and surroundings. Thus, many argued that the adoption of the Boston Port Act was unfair since it punished the whole city instead of several individuals accused of the protest. Indeed, the acceptance of this order strongly damaged the trading relations of the American colonies and led to its economic decline.

The Massachusetts Government Act caused even bigger dissatisfaction since it influenced both economic and political conditions of America. According to this act, the British monarchy provided itself with the exclusive right to assign the representatives to the government of Massachusetts. At that time, Americans were complaining about the absence of their representatives in the British government. However, the restriction of voting right and external appointment of the electors meant direct penetration into the domestic affairs of the American colonies.